East Olive Way

The burgeoning Capitol Hill ‘hood offers culinary and visual arts for the feasting.
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wake up
Beloved Dinette (1514 E Olive Way; 206.328.2282; dinetteseattle.com) has a brand-new neighbor: Stop by Crumble & Flake Patisserie (1500 E Olive Way; 206.329.1804; crumbleandflake.com) for one of chef/owner Neil Robertson’s much-craved croissants and cinnamon rolls or a seasonal macaron. But take heed: Treats are to-go only, and, at press time, were selling out as early as 10 a.m. Meanwhile, the forced closure (due to a slated mixed-use development) of beloved B&O Espresso (204 Belmont Ave. E; 206.322.5028; b-oespresso.com) has been rumored for years, but the 36-year-old dessert house keeps on keeping on.

hang out
Stop in at recently opened Blindfold Gallery (1718 E Olive Way, Suite A; 206.328.5100; blindfoldgallery.com) to experience work by Seattle artists, such as August’s featured photographer, George Ciardi, known for his spooky industrial landscapes (8/9–9/9). Peek into the headquarters of Rachel’s Ginger Beer (rachelsgingerbeer.com), where the tasty, all-natural nectar is handcrafted, then head next door to Montana (1506 E Olive Way; 206.422.4647; montanainseattle.com), the brand-new dive with a small-town Western vibe that dispenses the fruits of Rachel’s labors on tap, along with 10 beers. Stop by on a Sunday around 5 p.m. and score barbecued vittles (less than $10) from one of the weekly visiting dinner chefs.

eat and enjoy
Dine in style at May newcomer EVO Tapas Kitchen & Cabaret (1715 E Olive Way; 206.328.5293; evo-seattle.com), which serves up flatbreads ($8), croquettes ($6), truffled popcorn ($6) and more small plates alongside live music and other diversions (including, recently, Lady Gaga-themed vaudeville). The chic space (with a gorgeous patio) and neighboring dance club, The Social (1725 E Olive Way; thesocialseattle.com), were both designed by celebrated Seattle architecture firm Pb Elemental. For more dining, coupled with offbeat entertainment, head to Arabica Lounge (1550 E Olive Way; 206.347.6093; arabicalounge.com), which, depending on the night, serves up dinner or innovative (and sometimes odd) exhibitions (check website for details), such as 250 pounds of icing smeared on a guess-that-flavor wall.

Score Edgy Cotton Basics at Downtown's Do The Extraordinary

Score Edgy Cotton Basics at Downtown's Do The Extraordinary

Downtown apparel and accessories shop DTE offers a little something extra
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An in-store vault opens to reveal secret speakeasy, Blind Tiger

The newest retail outpost from fashion collaborators Justin Kercher and former Seahawks running back Shaun Alexander is offering downtown shoppers the opportunity to “Do The Extraordinary.” Taking over the 6,000-square-foot space on Sixth Avenue and Olive Way that previously housed European Antiques, Do The Extraordinary (DTE) opened last fall and is a lifestyle boutique for men and women offering locally designed, handmade, ready-to-wear clothing and accessories for the fashion-forward Seattleite. The brand’s edgy cotton basics come in black, white and various shades of gray, and include muscle T-shirts and sporty sweats for men, and tunics and dresses for women.

“DTE is really about the customers and creating an experience,” Kercher says. The space combines influences of the Seattle outdoors with urban design. Blow-torched sequoia tree tables and painted antlers flank vintage couches and hand-poured cement floors. Hidden behind the cash register area, speakeasy Blind Tiger, designed by Kercher and his family, is set up for private events and intimate concerts featuring local bands and DJs. DTE’s fall lineup includes several album release parties as well as a fall/winter fashion show.

The store’s upcoming events will “take [the retail experience] to another level,” says Kercher. Downtown, 1810 Sixth Ave.; dotheextraordinary.com