The PNB Dances into SAM's Olympic Sculpture Park

Don't miss the chance to catch this en plein air ballet performance
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Seattle Art Museum’s Olympic Sculpture Park, with its sweeping views of Elliott Bay, is always an enchanting place to enjoy a warm summer evening surrounded by art. This month, it will host several new works of art when Pacific Northwest Ballet (PNB) presents “Sculptured Dance” on August 11.

As part of the museum’s Summer at SAM series, PNBhas commissioned new works from five local choreographers, each of whom has been asked to respond to one of the park’s sculptures. Spectrum Dance Theater artistic director Donald Byrd has been paired with Roy McMakin’s wistful Untitled; PNB dancer Ezra Thomson with Tony Smith’s weighty, geometric Stinger; and Whim W’Him artistic director Olivier Wevers with Alexander Calder’s massive, looming and bright orange The Eagle. Kate Wallich, appropriately, will take on Roxy Paine’s stark and glistening Split; while former PNB soloist Kiyon Gaines will engage the park’s portentous centerpiece, Richard Serra’s Wake.

Dancers from PNB, Spectrum and Whim W’Him will perform with music from Art of Jazz and Theoretics. Come prepared to experience the park’s art in a completely new way. 6 p.m. Free.Downtown, 2901 Western Ave.; 206.654.3100; seattleartmuseum.org

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