Travel Easy With New In-Home Health Service

TravelRx service eliminates trips to the office
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Typhoid, dengue fever, measles.

These aren’t diseases most of us worry about—until we start planning that trip abroad to countries where these diseases are problematic. Helping you learn what vaccines or medications you need to protect yourself, and having them conveniently administered, is the mission of TravelRx (progressivetravelrx.com), a new Tacoma-based company.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that more tourists are at risk for travel-related illnesses, thanks to an increase in journeys to destinations in Asia and Africa, the two continents where most travel-related maladies originate. But many international travelers never get recommended immunizations before stepping on a plane.

 

That’s where TravelRx steps in. After clients fill out an online intake form and pay a small fee, the company brings vaccines and medications to their home or office, eliminating the need for visits to clinics and pharmacies for those meds. A minimum of five travelers is required for on-site visits by TravelRx—a requisite that makes the service attractive to companies with frequent business travelers, students traveling together for study abroad or families.

Founder and CEO Vidya Nair, Pharm.D., recommends scheduling the service from six to eight weeks before your trip to ensure the vaccines have time to take effect. Without the constraints of traditional medical office scheduling, says Nair, “the atmosphere is much more relaxed, and we have more time to answer specific questions that each traveler may have.” Bon voyage.

GoCstudio’s Floating Sauna Sends Winter Blues Adrift

GoCstudio’s Floating Sauna Sends Winter Blues Adrift

GoCstudio’s floating sauna is a one-of-a-kind space for blowing off steam
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Architect Jon Gentry climbs the custom aluminum ladder of the ‘wa_sauna’, goCstudio’s outdoor floating sauna, as Tony Kim back flips off the upper diving deck. Inside, Lydia Ramsey enjoys the heat of the sauna which makes that icy water feel sensational

Restrictions imposed by permits, budgets and difficult building sites can make it tough for designers to create something truly innovative, but Seattle-based architecture firm GoCstudio (gocstudio.com) doesn’t shy away from a challenge. That’s what prompted founders Jon Gentry and Aimée O’Carroll to try their hand at building Wa_sauna: a floating sauna currently docked on Lake Union just below the University Bridge.


Clad with spruce wood planks, the interior of the ‘wa_sauna’ features an upper and lower bench for reclining and a wood stove

 


The project—built with crowdfunding from more than 500 donations and in partnership with design/build students in the University of Washington’s Master of Architecture program—is a 12-foot-tall, 4,500-pound shed with an interior wood-burning stove, spruce-finished interior, an electric trolling motor and ebony-stained wooden exterior. The team was challenged to balance aesthetics with the utilitarian requirements of boatbuilding. “We quickly discovered that our initial concept—having the sauna anchored in the middle of the lake—wasn’t possible because of permitting,” explains Gentry. Instead, he and O’Carroll shifted their focus toward building a barge-type boat powered by an electric motor. “This allowed us so much flexibility in terms of location, use and interaction with other boats and kayaks on the water,” Gentry says. 


The ebony-stained plywood exteriors frame slot windows, so users enjoy outdoor views while sweating their blues away inside the sauna

Completed in 2015, Wa_sauna spent the summer of 2016 cruising between Portage Bay and Union Bay, and hosting events at Westward restaurant on the north side of Lake Union. GoCstudio will offer more public events this year to give more people the chance to experience the sauna. And while it’s not for sale, Gentry says you could certainly commission one as the experience of using the sauna is unlike any other. “The best part is being out on the water,” Gentry says. “It’s a very active experience; climb up to the roof deck, cold plunge into the lake and have a swim. Then climb back inside to warm up.” And how does it fare in one of Seattle’s storms? “We tie Wa_sauna up to the dock if it’s really stormy. It’s meant for calm, slow outings, not really for fighting the wind and wake from a big storm. Rain isn’t a problem, though.” Rain or shine, he says, “It’s quite nice.” 


A marine-grade plywood deck surrounds the sauna box, propelled by an electric trolling motor on the bow

See where the Wa_sauna’s next port will be at gocstudio.com/wa_sauna.