Culture

Tuesday, 03/10/2015 4:40 AM
The Seattle Times puts hard data to the trend all of us are feeling: the diminishment of Seattle’s middle class. The numbers show that half of all new households in King County are poor, and the other half rich—giving truth to the old line about “how the other half lives.” Half of the new households are below the county’s median household income of $35K, half earn roughly double the median at $180K.
Monday, 03/09/2015 7:36 PM
Seattle Dances gala
Movers and Shakers. On Saturday night, sequins and shimmys were rampant on the dance floor during the sixth-annual Plymouth Housing Group's "Seattle Dances" gala at Seattle's Fremont Studios.
Friday, 03/06/2015 4:04 PM
Uniqlo
Latin Cuisine Adds a Gyro Machine. Ever since Columbia City's Grecian Delight went temporarily out of business after an SUV ran into the space last August, locals complained for the loss of Greek fare in their neighborhood.
Thursday, 03/05/2015 9:17 PM
Among the many signs that spring has arrived are the wealth of excellent performances, exhibits and concerts suddenly competing for space in our calendars. Will you get to know a Lizard Boy, indulge in Splurge Land or buckle up with Chastity Belt? We recommend all three—and 42 more arts events—in our guide to the best things to see, hear and experience this season.  1. LOVE IS  COMPLICATED, NO MATTER WHERE…  [ON A SOUTHERN  PLANTATION WITH AN  ALCOHOLIC HUSBAND] Fresh off a stint playing the romantic leading roles in Carousel at The 5th, local stars Brandon O’Neill and Laura Griffith take on another fiery couple: Brick and Maggie in Tennessee Williams’ Pulitzer Prize–winning play Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. This Southern sizzler is one of several plays ACT is restaging for its 50th anniversary. 4/17–5/17. Times and prices vary. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St.; 206.292.7676; acttheatre.org [AMID A LAND DISPUTE IN RURAL IRELAND] John Patrick Shanley won several Tony Awards and the Pulitzer Prize for his play Doubt: A Parable, and nabbed an Oscar for his film Moonstruck. With his newest work, Outside Mullingar (nominated for a Tony in 2014), he leaves behind his beloved NYC setting for rural Ireland, where neighboring 40-something farmers turn from feuding to falling in love. 4/24–5/17. Times and prices vary. Seattle Repertory Theatre, 155 Mercer St.; 206.443.2222; seattlerep.org [IN BED WITH YOUR PARTNER AND A STRANGER] In Threesome, by award-winning Seattle writer Yussef El Guindi, two Egyptian Americans decide a threesome will solve their relationship woes. Guindi has proven himself a pro at penning awkward sexual scenes (see Pilgrims Musa and Sheri in the New World), so expect squirmy hilarity (not to mention politics, gender bias and the repercussions of long-held secrets) to ensue in this world-premiere. 6/5–6/28. Times and prices vary. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St.; 206.292.7676; acttheatre.org 2. THERE’S NO “I”  IN TEAM… [AT A RUNDOWN MOVIE  THEATER] Along with the customary humiliations of a first job come first adult friendships, first time figuring out how to pay rent and first glimmers of what the future might bring. Three millennials experience such firsts together—while cleaning up popcorn at a struggling movie theater in The Flick, a 2014 Pulitzer Prize winner by Annie Baker (Circle Mirror Transformation), staged by New Century Theatre Company in its new home. 3/5–4/4. Times and prices vary. 12th Avenue Arts, 1620 12th Ave.; 206.661.8223; wearenctc.org [AT A HIGH-END REAL ESTATE OFFICE ON THE SKIDS]  The comedy is dark and the blows are low in Laura Schellhardt’s (The K of D) The Comparables, a world-premiere play in which three women working in real estate go for each other’s throats and after each other’s job security. Billed as a “neo-feminist satire,” the story explores three clashing perspectives on how to get ahead as a businesswoman. 3/6–3/29. Times and prices vary. Seattle Repertory Theatre, 155 Mercer St.; 206.443.2222; seattlerep.org [ON A BASKETBALL COURT IN A TINY DUST BOWL TOWN] Meg Miroshnik’s The Tall Girls chronicles a group of young women seeking escape routes from their struggling Dust Bowl town. The exit signs light up when a stranger shows up and organizes the girls into basketball team. This West Coast premiere from the author of The Fairytale Lives of Russian Girls, produced by Washington Ensemble Theatre, ups the tension with a basketball game played live on stage. 5/1–5/18. Times and prices vary. 12th Avenue Arts, 1620 12th Ave.; 206.661.8223; washingtonensemble.org 3. BEST TO BURST INTO SONG WHEN FACED WITH  UNFAMILIAR  SCENARIOS,  INCLUDING… [SUDDEN JOURNEY TO THE UNDERWORLD] In the new pop-rock musical Jasper in Deadland, a teen boy facing garden-variety demons is suddenly plunged into an underworld awash in more tangible monsters. Searching for a lost love, he encounters all manner of creatures (hailing from a global array of cultural mythologies), and in the process learns what it really means to be alive. 4/30—5/24. Times and prices vary. The 5th Avenue Theatre, 1308 Fifth Ave.; 206.625.1900; 5thavenue.org [INCREDIBLY PERSISTENT FREAK IN A WHITE MASK] Andrew Lloyd Webber’s The Phantom of the Opera still reigns as Broadway’s longest-running musical, and it’s easy to see why, what with the disfigured creeper who lives in a secret lair under the opera house, a heroine who seems to be kind of into her stalker, and, of course, those big, bold songs. 4/30–5/10. Times and prices vary. The Paramount Theatre, 911 Pine St.; 206.682.1414; stgpresents.org TheatreThis season’s lineup teaches audiences some valuable lessons [LIZARD BOY]Seattle playwright/composer/cellist Justin Huertas presents his world-premiere musical, Lizard Boy, a coming-of-age/coming-out story that takes inspiration from comic books, iconic love stories and personal history. Expect catchy folk-rock songs, a boy covered in green scales, a precipitous dragon bite, an all-powerful female rocker and newfound superpowers. 3/27–4/26. Times and prices vary. Seattle Repertory Theatre, 155 Mercer St.; 206.443.2222; seattlerep.org  1. Love is Complicated, No Matter Where:On a Southern Plantation With an Alcoholic Husband Seattle actors Brandon O’Neill and Laura Griffith play the steamy lead duo in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, opening 4/17 at ACT; photo by Hayley YoungFresh off a stint playing the romantic leading roles in Carousel at The 5th, local stars Brandon O’Neill and Laura Griffith take on another fiery couple: Brick and Maggie in Tennessee Williams’ Pulitzer Prize–winning play Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. This Southern sizzler is one of several plays ACT is restaging for its 50th anniversary. 4/17–5/17. Times and prices vary. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St.; 206.292.7676 Amid a Land Dispute in Rural Ireland John Patrick Shanley won several Tony Awards and the Pulitzer Prize for his play Doubt: A Parable, and nabbed an Oscar for his film Moonstruck. With his newest work, Outside Mullingar (nominated for a Tony in 2014), he leaves behind his beloved NYC setting for rural Ireland, where neighboring 40-something farmers turn from feuding to falling in love. 4/24–5/17. Times and prices vary. Seattle Repertory Theatre, 155 Mercer St.; 206.443.2222 In Bed with Your Partner and a Stranger In Threesome, by award-winning Seattle writer Yussef El Guindi, two Egyptian Americans decide a threesome will solve their relationship woes. Guindi has proven himself a pro at penning awkward sexual scenes (see Pilgrims Musa and Sheri in the New World), so expect squirmy hilarity (not to mention politics, gender bias and the repercussions of long-held secrets) to ensue in this world-premiere. 6/5–6/28. Times and prices vary. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St.; 206.292.7676 2. There's No "I" In Team: At a Rundown Movie Theatre Along with the customary humiliations of a first job come first adult friendships, first time figuring out how to pay rent and first glimmers of what the future might bring. Three millennials experience such firsts together—while cleaning up popcorn at a struggling movie theater in The Flick, a 2014 Pulitzer Prize winner by Annie Baker (Circle Mirror Transformation), staged by New Century Theatre Company in its new home. 3/5–4/4. Times and prices vary. 12th Avenue Arts, 1620 12th Ave.; 206.661.8223 At a High-end Real Estate Office On the Skids The comedy is dark and the blows are low in Laura Schellhardt’s (The K of D) The Comparables, a world-premiere play in which three women working in real estate go for each other’s throats and after each other’s job security. Billed as a “neo-feminist satire,” the story explores three clashing perspectives on how to get ahead as a businesswoman. 3/6–3/29. Times and prices vary. Seattle Repertory Theatre, 155 Mercer St.; 206.443.2222 On a Basketball Court in a Tiny Dust Bowl Town Meg Miroshnik’s The Tall Girls chronicles a group of young women seeking escape routes from their struggling Dust Bowl town. The exit signs light up when a stranger shows up and organizes the girls into basketball team. This West Coast premiere from the author of The Fairytale Lives of Russian Girls, produced by Washington Ensemble Theatre, ups the tension with a basketball game played live on stage. 5/1–5/18. Times and prices vary. 12th Avenue Arts, 1620 12th Ave.; 206.661.8223 3. Best to Burst Into Song When Faced With Unfamiliar Scenarios, Including... Sudden Journey to the Underworld In the new pop-rock musical Jasper in Deadland, a teen boy facing garden-variety demons is suddenly plunged into an underworld awash in more tangible monsters. Searching for a lost love, he encounters all manner of creatures (hailing from a global array of cultural mythologies), and in the process learns what it really means to be alive. 4/30—5/24. Times and prices vary. The 5th Avenue Theatre, 1308 Fifth Ave.; 206.625.1900 Incredibly Persistent Freak In a White Mask  Andrew Lloyd Webber’s The Phantom of the Opera still reigns as Broadway’s longest-running musical, and it’s easy to see why, what with the disfigured creeper who lives in a secret lair under the opera house, a heroine who seems to be kind of into her stalker, and, of course, those big, bold songs. 4/30–5/10. Times and prices vary. The Paramount Theatre, 911 Pine St.; 206.682.1414
Thursday, 03/05/2015 8:32 PM
Aurora Bridge
As a city that's had plenty of recent transportation quirks--Bertha delays and getting stuck, for one--Seattle public transportation has plans to trudge forward in a big way.
Thursday, 03/05/2015 7:38 PM
Black River and Me and My Daddy Listen to Bob Marley
Black River by S.M. Hulse (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, $24)
Thursday, 03/05/2015 6:12 PM
Must BlendGenre Bender Showcases Inspired Artist Collaborations(3/6 to 3/7, 8 p.m.) It's time once again for Genre Bender, an exceptional performance event that pairs up local artists from different fields and asks them to go forth and make something together. This year features five promising duos—including conceptual artist C. Davida Ingram with composer Hanna Benn, musician/animator David Nixon with poet Sarah Galvin, and vocalist Okanomodé with aerialist Lara Paxton—all of whom will reveal their new creations at the Cornish Playhouse at Seattle Center.
Thursday, 03/05/2015 5:56 PM
A group of cool dads is petitioning Amazon to change the name of its Amazon Mom service, which provides discounts on diapers, baby products and food (you know, stuff only us ladies handle) to Amazon Family. The petition has nearly 5,000 signatures and the group hopes to get the online retailer's attention. Seems like a no brainer. Your move, Amazon.
Wednesday, 03/04/2015 10:11 PM
Scenes from the workshop of cosplayer Eric Jones, of CoregeekSometimes, when trying to replicate a villainous, power-hungry Asgardian’s wardrobe, you just have to punt. “I use a technique where I wrap the [human] subject with plastic wrap and tape—either duct or masking,” says Eric Jones, about making the form for the Loki costume (from The Avengers) for Comicon last year. “Then I’ll draw the shape of the armor on the taped area, then cut it off the subject to use as a pattern to be transferred to the main material like Worbla or foam.” Based in Mill Creek, Jones runs Coregeek, a one-man prop- and costume-building enterprise. Over the past four years, he’s taped, wrapped, cut, glued and meticulously handcrafted around 10 costumes and countless props (both on commission and for himself). A comics and movie fan and a woodworking hobbyist who has also dabbled in graphic design and works in law enforcement, Jones says he makes the costumes—which require upward of 200 hours spent in his workshop—for two main reasons: to enjoy cosplaying with his family and to bring smiles to the con’s attendees. “I love seeing my daughters get into the roles, and watching them interact with others at a con,” he says. “It’s truly a labor of love to make a couple hundred dollars in crafting supplies look like thousands of dollars in armor.” For ECCC this year, he’s making a Fierce Deity Link costume (from “The Legend of Zelda: Majora’s Mask” Nintendo game) for his youngest daughter, complete with a 5-foot-long, double-helix bladed sword and body armor. His oldest daughter is going as Thranduil, King of the Elves from the Hobbit movies, adorned in an ornate robe and jewelry. And Jones and his wife will attend as gender-swapped versions of characters from Wreck-It Ralph: He will be a male version of Sgt. Calhoun, and his wife, Krista, will be Fix-It Felix (or, as they’ve dubbed her, Fix-It Felicia). He started making the costumes in December and anticipates they will take about three months to complete. And while costs vary per costume, last year Jones spent about $700 on Loki’s attire and props alone. But for Jones, cosplaying is worth the effort. “The challenge of re-creating a costume or prop is the most exciting for me,” he says. “It’s kind of like putting together a puzzle from scratch.” The King Loki costume, which cosplayer Eric Jones made for his oldest daughter, Katelyn, for last year’s ECCC, took more than 200 hours to construct over three monthsRead our full, behind-the-scenes coverage on the 13th annual Emerald City Comicon (March 27-29), including photos galore, here.
Wednesday, 03/04/2015 10:05 PM
Otter
One of the many pleasures of beachcombing along the shores of Puget Sound is the immense variation in the colors of the stones—deep purple, jade green, burgundy, caramel, speckled or striped black and white. To wanderers, it looks like a beautiful carpet but to marine scientists the diversity tells an exciting story about the geological evolution of our region.
Wednesday, 03/04/2015 9:55 PM
If you find yourself approaching the Washington State Convention Center later this month and Thor, Wonder Woman or Geordi La Forge hold the door open for you, just smile, nod a “thank you” and step right in like you belong. You’ve arrived at Emerald City Comicon (ECCC)—ground zero for Seattle’s superhero fandom.
Wednesday, 03/04/2015 5:26 PM
Way to go, Bellingham: The city to our north has earned the title as one of the least obese cities in the U.S. after a recent Gallup survey found that "just 18.7 percent of Bellingham residents have a Body Mass Index of 30 or more." The low BMI brings Bellingham to the 5th best overall. The number one least obese city in the U.S.? Boulder, Colo.
Tuesday, 03/03/2015 4:29 PM
Despite recent bike lane additions in sections through downtown and other areas of the city, bicycle collisions in Seattle are on the rise. King 5 News reports that "recent data reveals collisions increased by 34 in 2014.
Tuesday, 03/03/2015 12:12 AM
In 2003, Seattle author Brent Hartinger published Geography Club, the first book in his young adult series that follows gay high school sophomore Russel Middlebrook and his quest to interact with other gay teens at his school. The novel earned praise from reviewers--USA Today called it an "honest, emotional and funny story," and The Seattle Times said it was a "breath of fresh air." In 2013, Geography Club was adapted into a feature film starring Scott Bakula and Ana Gasteyer.
Monday, 03/02/2015 8:54 PM
Godfrey Daniels
For the last 25 years, Seattle performer Randy Minkler has been taking the stage in the guise of a clown named Godfrey Daniels, and even he agrees with the general consensus: “Clowns can be scary.” But Minkler has a strategy for getting beyond that hard truth. “I don’t think of him as a clown,” he says of Godfrey, “he’s more like an internally driven puppet.”