Environment

Spring arrived early in Seattle this year. Above average temperatures and dry days were the norm in February. The cherry trees at the University of Washington bloomed two weeks ahead of schedule.

She is nine months pregnant on this sunny fall day.

Film icon Robert Redford joined a chorus of voices when he published his stance against the Pebble Mine in Alaska’s Bristol Bay

Salmon spawn in our rivers, climb our fish ladders, adorn everything from totem poles to T-shirts and grace our plates. They are synonymous with Seattle.

This February, a young killer whale washed up on the chilly shores of southwest Washington’s Long Beach Peninsula.

You wouldn’t think a Ballard bungalow with pink asbestos siding and lead paint would appeal to a couple with an interest in the environment, but Rachel and Izaak Koller planned to remodel the Ballard home themselves—wearing suitab

Those who grew up in the 1970s may recall the appearance of a brick in the bathroom toilet tank—a popular do-it-yourself water-saving measure. Fortunately, living green has become a little more sophisticated in recent decades.

Perched on a red chair at pseudo-Mafioso bar Vito’s on First Hill last week, giraffe-legged, rock-jawed Ted Danson presented me with an environmental riddle: He does not surf.

At the warm, brine-scented Northwest Fisheries Science Laboratory (NFSL) in Montlake, soft-spoken biologist Paul McElhany and a team of scientists immerse geoduck larvae in a multitude of saltwater baths.