Foraging

Harvest the licorice fern to add a unique flavor to sauces and infusions

Plan now for seasonal foraging, like a chanterelle mushroom hunt in the fall

For everything, there is a season—and a forager can make the most of each one with a little planning

Langdon Cook goes on a late autumn hunt for watercress

On a lazy summer day at the beach, we dug clams and cooked them on a camp stove as the sun tracked across a cloudless sky.

My first priority as a forager is to enjoy the fresh air. Second is a good meal. Third—and not a distant third, mind you—is the inherent health benefits of wild foods. Nature will take care of us if we let her.

Dig It! We’ve got so many clams, you could say it’s an embarrassment of bivalves. Manila clams, in particular, are easy to dig and nearly foolproof in the pot.

Though they’re rarely hot and sunny, Washington’s coastal beaches really bring the drama: wild, ever-changing weather, vast stretches of windswept, solitary beaches and fantastic, eerie sea stacks.

Tropical scenes in our corner of the continent are infrequent, but last summer, on one of those bluebird July days, I watched a guy in board shorts, tank top and sandals casually employ a foot pump to inflate a small rubber raft a stone’s throw fr

On a damp spring day, Seattle floral designer Katherine Anderson climbs a tree in some woods south of Duvall.