Recipe of the Week: Marijuana-Smoked Gelato

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This article originally appeared on The Fresh Toast.

Cold-smoking matcha gelato may not sound like your cup of tea, but as chef Shota Nakajima demonstrates, it’s really quite easy. All you need is an ice cream maker and a smoker. And some basic ingredients you probably already have in your fridge for the gelato base.

“You can also just use melted vanilla ice cream for the base,” says the 26-year old chef-owner of Naka restaurant in Seattle. “Then re-churn it after you smoke it.”

For a Fresh Toast demo, Nakajima, who worked at Japan’s Michelin-starred Sakamoto before opening Naka in June 2015, cold smoked gelato with cedar chips. But you can use pretty much anything.

“If you’re using marijuana,” Nakajima says, “when the gelato melts, you get this nice, marijuana flavor. It tastes delicious!”

Here’s how you can do it at home. 


Cold Smoked Matcha (or Marijuana) Gelato


Ingredients 
450g milk
150g cream
120g sugar
75g egg yolk
½ vanilla bean (split open, scrape out the innards)
2Tbsp matcha

Directions
Boil milk, cream and vanilla bean (including pod) on low heat.
Whisk egg yolk and sugar until white.
Add hot milk and cream to yolk and sugar mixture slowly (if you add too quickly you’ll cook the eggs) and bring up heat to 80 degrees.
Stir in matcha.
Strain.
Cool in an ice bath. (If it’s summer, feel free to hop in the tub, too!)

Place mixture in metal container, cover with plastic wrap, make a small hole in the plastic wrap and insert smoker (make sure to seal it as best you can) and fill container with smoke. Ideally, chill smoked mixture overnight to thoroughly infuse it. Place mixture in an ice cream machine and churn until desired consistency (about 20 minutes). Eat! 

For the original article, click How to Make Marijuana-Smoked Gelato

Recipe of the Week: Casco Antiguo's Corn Mash

Recipe of the Week: Casco Antiguo's Corn Mash

Serve it as a side dish or eat it straight from the pan
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A little like mac 'n' cheese... but with corn!

Comfort food takes many forms. That satisfying combo of sweet and savory are almost necessary. Plenty of cheese doesn’t hurt. Now here’s a recipe that hits on all the best elements of comforting cuisine, plus a little Serrano chili for heat. 

Casco Antiguo is a Pioneer Square Mexican restaurant best known for its 30-ingredient mole. But it’s this modest corn side dish that’s a favorite among regulars. Owners say it's a play off a traditional Mexican street food called" ezquites," where corn is boiled with epazote and butter, then served in a disposable cup with cheese, salt, lime, chili powder and mayo. 

Since it's damn hard to find fresh corn this time of year, so I used all frozen, and I think the flavor was still good. If you don’t have crema on hand, I used sour cream in a pinch—it was firmer than crema, but I think leant a similar flavor. I used a whole Serrano and was disappointed in the lack of heat, though that’s a fault of the pepper and not the dish. Perhaps leave the seeds in if you want it a little hotter (I will next time). At the restaurant, it’s served alongside everything from braised pork cheeks to baby octopus—I think it would be a great with a Southern-inspired barbecue feast as well. 

Casco Antiguo Corn Mash
Makes 6-8 Servings

1 tbsp canola oil
2 ½ cups raw sweet corn
2 ½ cups pre-cooked frozen corn, thawed
½ -1 Serrano pepper, deseeded and chopped
½ tsp salt
½ tsp pepper
¼ cup cream cheese, softened
¾ cups crema Mexicana (found in Mexican markets or specialty stores)
¾ cups Monterey Jack cheese, grated

In a large sauté pan on medium heat, add canola oil and raw corn. Sauté for two to three minutes. Add the thawed corn, chopped peppers, salt and pepper. Sauté until corn and peppers are tender. Fold in the cream cheese until corn and peppers are thoroughly incorporated. Whisk in the crema Mexicana until the dish becomes creamy in texture. Add the Monterey cheese and continue to whisk until the cheese is melted and the dish is smooth and saucy. Remove from heat and let stand 10 minutes before serving.