Seattle's New Mobile Fashion Truck Trend?

Board the J Project bus and get to shopping
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We have a bit of a joke-that-is-not-actually-a-joke around the office about declaring something a “trend”: You can’t call it one until you find three examples. So naturally, since news broke a few weeks ago that the city’s first “fashion truck”, The Kippy Ding Ding, is now roaming the streets (more here), I’ve been on the hunt for two more.

Well, what do you know, Kippy has company:

closetspace

Closet Space: Further afield but worth a scout, the Closet Space truck makes it debut this weekend in the April Fool’s parking lot on Waters St in Port Townsend. Owner Rosie Itti (who has been holding pop-up sales in town for the past year in preparation) has vamped up a 2011 Chevy van and now travels with her selection of new clothing and bags in tow. Stalk them here on Facebook.

jproject

J Project Clothing: Jamie Marie has been parking her charmingly revamped J Project Clothing short bus at the Shoreline Farmer’s Market on Saturdays since May, selling screen-printed tops and handmade scarves. As of now, Marie has dates scheduled through October; follow J. Project here for updates.

Bingo. We have a trend, people.

Photos courtesy of Closet Space and J Project Clothing

Score Edgy Cotton Basics at Downtown's Do The Extraordinary

Score Edgy Cotton Basics at Downtown's Do The Extraordinary

Downtown apparel and accessories shop DTE offers a little something extra
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An in-store vault opens to reveal secret speakeasy, Blind Tiger

The newest retail outpost from fashion collaborators Justin Kercher and former Seahawks running back Shaun Alexander is offering downtown shoppers the opportunity to “Do The Extraordinary.” Taking over the 6,000-square-foot space on Sixth Avenue and Olive Way that previously housed European Antiques, Do The Extraordinary (DTE) opened last fall and is a lifestyle boutique for men and women offering locally designed, handmade, ready-to-wear clothing and accessories for the fashion-forward Seattleite. The brand’s edgy cotton basics come in black, white and various shades of gray, and include muscle T-shirts and sporty sweats for men, and tunics and dresses for women.

“DTE is really about the customers and creating an experience,” Kercher says. The space combines influences of the Seattle outdoors with urban design. Blow-torched sequoia tree tables and painted antlers flank vintage couches and hand-poured cement floors. Hidden behind the cash register area, speakeasy Blind Tiger, designed by Kercher and his family, is set up for private events and intimate concerts featuring local bands and DJs. DTE’s fall lineup includes several album release parties as well as a fall/winter fashion show.

The store’s upcoming events will “take [the retail experience] to another level,” says Kercher. Downtown, 1810 Sixth Ave.; dotheextraordinary.com