These Organic Belgian Linens are Bedtime Bliss

We can’t stop thinking about these luxe organic linens
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  • Rocco, the beloved pet of Phinney Ridge interior designer and store owner Renate Ruby, sits atop luxurious layers of Libeco Belgian linens in the Adorn boutique and showroom. Wallpaper from Port Townsend-based artist Susan Harter and Visual Comfort lamps help create a cozy feel. The wheel sculpture is part of Ruby’s private collection
Rocco, the beloved pet of Phinney Ridge interior designer and store owner Renate Ruby, sits atop luxurious layers of Libeco Belgian linens in the Adorn boutique and showroom

“I’m selling products for people who are tired of having things break,” says Renate Ruby of the fine home goods selection at Adorn, her Phinney Ridge boutique and showroom. 

Ruby’s collection of Belgian linen is getting us excited about making the bed. The interior designer sings the praises of linen as a textile for upholstery and drapery, but says that, most importantly, it facilitates the ultimate night’s sleep. “If you haven’t slept in linen, it’s really different,” she says. “Cotton is smooth, but linen is soft.”


Image by: Alex Crook
White linens from Libeco’s ‘Classics’ collection: kids love that it’s softer than cotton


Ruby’s linens (about $600 for a queen sheet set) are sourced from Libeco, the top linen mill in Belgium. The linen starts as flax and grows for more than three months before blooming for a single day. It’s then pulled up by the roots and left in the fields for three to four weeks for a process called retting, which breaks the flax down into soft fibers to be spun into yarn. Belgian mills get first pick of these fibers, which, like produce, vary with each harvest. This means the linens Ruby sells could likely become heirlooms. “People hand their linen sheets down,” she says. “Think of your Levi 501s. You buy them, break them in yourself…and you have them for the rest of your life. With these linens, it’s the same.” Did somebody say bedtime? Phinney Ridge, Adorn, 7003 Third Ave. NW; 206.499.6220; adorn.house 

Recipe of the Week: Chamomile and Coconut Granola

Recipe of the Week: Chamomile and Coconut Granola

Start your morning with a nutritious, filling serving of this toasted, honey-drizzled granola
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  • Start your morning with a nutritious, filling serving of this toasted, honey-drizzled granola

Recipe of the Week is contributed by Seattle-based award-winning cookbook author, urban farmer and Seattle magazine contributor Amy Pennington.

Originally published in my book Apartment Gardening, this is one of my all-time favorite recipes. While you have time this week, make a big batch and stock the pantry for the inevitable crush of soon-to-be healthy eating plans.

I often have a jar of this granola on the shelves of my pantry. It’s a nutritious and filling topping for non-fat yogurt, making it an excellent choice for anyone trying to eat healthy or commit to a morning routine.

This recipe comes from my friend Lynda. I eat her homemade granola recipe with a drizzle of honey over a big pool of loose yogurt. I either make my own yogurt, or buy Strauss, a brand that makes pourable yogurt. Her granola has no added butter or sugar, so it’s not gooey-crunchy like most granola, but it does have toasty, flaky bits like coconut, oats and almonds. The flavor is intensified with some chamomile buds and sesame seeds. After trying this, you’ll never think of granola in the same way again.

 

Chamomile & Coconut Granola
Makes 6 servings

1 cup rolled oats
1 cup sliced almonds
1 cup raw, unsweetened coconut flakes
1⁄4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon crushed dried chamomile buds
1 tablespoon untoasted sesame seeds

1 tablespoon flaxseed meal

Preheat the oven to 350 ̊F. Place all ingredients on a sheet pan and stir to combine. Place in the oven and toast for 5 minutes. Remove the pan from the oven and toss, redistributing granola into a single layer. Toast until the coconut flakes are golden brown, another 3 to 
4 minutes. Serve by the handful over a bowl of plain yogurt with a drizzle of honey and some fresh fruit. Cooled leftover granola can be stored in the pantry, in a sealed container, for about 3 weeks. For more recipes using chamomile, check out my Chamomile Cordial recipe here.

For tips on harvesting and drying chamomile for recipes or medicinals, check out my How-To: Drying Edible Flower Petals.