Why Olympia's 222 Market is Worth the Trip

Olympia’s new artisan food market puts the capital city on the culinary map
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Sofie's Scoops at the 222 Market

Olympians, we apologize for invading your downtown parking. But, an artisan-style food hall like 222 Market (Olympia, 222 Capitol Way N; 222market.com) is an exciting destination and one we food lovers think is worth the drive.

At press time, the 15,000-square-foot building was scheduled to open in September, showcasing artisan food and beverage producers from around the Pacific Northwest, including Broth Bar By Salt Fire & Time; small-batch gelateria Sofie’s Scoops; and the city’s first oyster bar.

The 1940s-era building was originally the home of Olympia’s Packard car dealership and over the years has housed a variety of businesses. But, with renowned bakery The Bread Peddler as an anchor tenant for more than a decade, the building’s owners, Gray and Joy Graham, saw potential for a full-fledged food hall. They partnered with Olympia chef Lela Cross (co-owner of Capitale, Cielo Blu and Dillinger’s Cocktails & Kitchen) to handpick local, independent merchants, including a florist (Fleurae), and then hired green architect firm Artisans Group, which gutted and opened up the building’s interior, repurposing recycled lumber and Douglas fir into tables and countertops.

222 Market certainly plays a vital role in downtown Olympia’s revitalization, but it’s also pretty great for the destination-dining Seattleite. Here’s what to eat.


Photos: Sofie’s Scoops: Sofie Landis; Broth Bar: John Valls; Chelsea Farms Oyster Bar: Courtesy of Chelsea Farms Oyster Bar; Blind Pig Spirits and the Bread Peddler Crepe: Piper Backholm

Road Trip: Concrete and East Skagit County

Road Trip: Concrete and East Skagit County

Enjoy a scenic drive and stay out in eagle country
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View the eagles during the Skagit Eagle Festival; snap a pic and enter it by January 15 in the Skagit River Bald Eagle Center’s 20th anniversary photo contest. Go win it!

WHERE: Concrete and east Skagit County.

WHY: Eagles are flocking to their spectacular winter getaway—why not join them? The Skagit Eagle Festival (1/1–1/31; concrete-wa.com) happens every January weekend, and your car makes a perfect blind for snapping pictures without scaring off these magnificent birds. Celebrate along the Skagit River with arts and crafts, wine tasting, photography tours and river rafting for eagle spotters.

NIGHT OWLS: Check out the Concrete Theatre, built in 1923 (45920 Main St.; 360.941.0403; concrete-theatre.com), updated for films, live music and events during the festival. early birds: Stop by 5b’s Bakery (45597 Main St.; 360.853.8700; 5bsbakery.com) for quality gluten-free baked goods and more for breakfast or lunch. For dinner, there’s Annie’s Pizza Station (44568 State Route 20; 360.853.7227; anniespizzastation.net), whose handcrafted cuisine would be a hit even in a town bigger than Concrete, population 753.

RULE THE ROOST: Spend the night in one of Ovenell’s Heritage Inn log cabins, located on a historic ranch across the river (46276 Concrete Sauk Valley Road; 360.853.8494; ovenells-inn.com). Pick up a steak or two—the cows are raised right there on the ranch—and throw them on the provided barbecue. Had enough of eagles? Elk, deer and coyotes are known to roam the ranch on a daily basis.