Cancer Specialties: Medical Oncology

By Seattle Mag

June 16, 2011

Physicians with subspecialties in treating cancer can also be found under listings for Colon & Recta

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MEDICAL ONCOLOGY

David M. Aboulafia, M.D., Virginia Mason Seattle Main Clinic, Buck Pavilion, 1100 Ninth Ave., 206.223.6193, Virginia Mason Medical Center; University of Michigan Medical School, 1983; AIDS/HIV, general hematology, AIDS-related cancers, leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma

Frederick R. Appelbaum, M.D., Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 825 Eastlake Ave. E, 206.288.7222, University of Washington Medical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center; Tufts University, 1972; bone marrow transplant, leukemia

Anthony Back, M.D., Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 825 Eastlake Ave. E, 206.288.7222, University of Washington Medical Center; Harvard Medical School, 1984; palliative care, gastrointestinal cancer

Oliver Batson, M.D., The Everett Clinic, 1717 13th St., Suite 300, Everett, 425.297.5500, Providence Regional Medical Center; Johns Hopkins University, 1984

Stephen S. Chen, M.D., Ph.D., The Polyclinic, 1145 Broadway, 206.860.2341, Swedish Medical Center, Virginia Mason Medical Center; Tongji Medical University–Wuhan, PR China, 1985; lung cancer, gastrointestinal cancer, breast cancer, hematologic malignancies

H. Joachim Deeg, M.D., Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave. N, 206.667.5985, University of Washington Medical Center; Friedrich-Wilhelms Universität, Germany, 1972; myelodysplastic syndromes, bone marrow failure disorders, hematologic malignancies, graft-versus-host disease

David E. Dong, M.D., Puget Sound Cancer Centers, 1560 N 115th St., Suite G16, 206.365.8252, Northwest Hospital and Medical Center; University of Utah, 1986

Philip J. Gold, M.D., Swedish Cancer Institute, 1221 Madison St., Suite 200, 206.386.2121, Swedish Medical Center; University of Miami School of Medicine, 1991; gastrointestinal cancer

Peter Jiang, M.D., Ph.D., The Everett Clinic, 1717 13th St., Suite 300, Everett, 425.297.5500, Providence Regional Medical Center; Hua Bei Medical College, China, 1986

Douglas J. Lee, M.D., Puget Sound Cancer Centers, 1560 N 115th St., Suite G-16, 206.365.8252, Northwest Hospital and Medical Center; Yale University, 1981; pain management, breast cancer

David G. Maloney, M.D., Ph.D., Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 825 Eastlake Ave. E, 206.288.7222, University of Washington Medical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center; Stanford University, 1985; lymphoma, bone marrow and stem cell transplant, vaccine therapy

Thomas W. Malpass, M.D., Virginia Mason Seattle Main Clinic, Buck Pavilion, 1100 Ninth Ave., 206.223.6193, Virginia Mason Medical Center; University of Virginia School of Medicine, 1975; leukemia, gynecologic cancer, palliative care, hematology

Stephen Petersdorf, M.D., Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 825 Eastlake Ave. E, 206.288.7222, University of Washington Medical Center; Brown University, 1983; lymphoma, myelodysplastic syndromes, leukemia

Vincent J. Picozzi Jr., M.D., Virginia Mason Seattle Main Clinic, Buck Pavilion, 1100 Ninth Ave., 206.223.6193, Virginia Mason Medical Center; Stanford University, 1978; pancreatic cancer, gastrointestinal cancer, genitourinary cancer, hematologic oncology, myelodysplasia

David A. White, M.D., The Polyclinic, 1145 Broadway, 206.860.2341, Swedish Medical Center; Yale University, 1982

Originally published in July 2011

 

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