Sunday Night Football Grill Returns to Feed Essential Workers, Teachers

Wednesday’s event featured appearances by the Seahawk Dancers and the Seahawks' mascot, Blitz
| Updated: October 9, 2020
 
 
  • Wednesday’s event featured appearances by the Seahawk Dancers and the Seahawks' mascot, Blitz

Ahead of the Seahawks’ next game against the Minnesota Vikings this Sunday evening, the Sunday Night Football Grill provided free meals to local teachers on Wednesday.

In partnership with First + Goal Hospitality and Levy Restaurants, the official concession providers of the Seahawks, the fan experience bus fed employees of Cleveland High School. The next stops for the Sunday Night Football Grill were St. Anne Hospital (formerly Highline Medical Center) in Burien and the Safeway Distribution Center in Auburn on Thursday. 

NBC Sports, which broadcasts Sunday Night Football, brings the mobile concession stand to the host team's city each Sunday night. So far this season the grill has provided more than 1,100 meals for doctors, nurses, fire departments and other essential workers in Kansas Cit, Seattle, New Orleans and San Francisco. The Sunday Night Football Grill previously stopped in Seattle and Renton in September, when the undefeated Seahawks defeated the New England Patriots on Sunday Night Football.

Wednesday’s event featured appearances by the Seahawk Dancers and the Seahawks' mascot, Blitz. 

To keep the events safe, social distancing and masks are required. The grill is limited to feeding around 50 fans per hour.

“The teachers are some of the most important people in the world because they seed in to our next generation,” Grover Principal and Seahawks fan George Breland told KING5. “Often they’re underpaid and underappreciated but we appreciate them and we thank the NFL for appreciating them."

Related Content

From coffee shops to doggy daycares, Seattle magazine wants to hear your voice

From coffee shops to doggy daycares, Seattle magazine wants to hear your voice

Everyone wants to know when the pandemic will end. But perhaps a better question is: What will it look like to go on

Everyone wants to know when the pandemic will end. But perhaps a better question is: What will it look like to go on.

Abigail Carter had never seen her elderly neighbor. While social distancing, she worried how she might help him.

Abigail Carter passed the house with the mossy roof every day. But now, during the pandemic, she thought about her elderly neighbor she didn't know and had never seen while on her daily walks.

Photographer Ted Zee has been documenting the way people are coping with stay-at-home orders. "As part of an exercise in socially distant portraiture, and a way to address my own anxieties, I stepped out to learn more about my neighbors."