Food & Drink

The 16th Annual Moisture Festival Celebrates Seattle’s Culture of Weird

The festival kicks off on March 14

By Gavin Borchert March 1, 2019

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This article originally appeared in the March 2019 issue of Seattle magazine.

This article appears in print in the March 2019 issue. Click here to subscribe.

Indefatigable reporters that we are, we intrepidly ferreted out some exclusive top-secret sneak-preview info about this year’s 16th annual Moisture Festival, our city’s yearly showcase for the weird and the wonderful in the worlds of circus and “comedy/varieté.” (OK, we asked and they told us.)

As usual, the bifurcated festival presents all-ages shows at Hale’s Palladium and “Libertease” burlesque cabarets at Broadway Performance Hall. Among the performers, whom we can now reveal, are tapper Jason Rodgers; magicians Gazzo and Robert Strong; Inga, the Seattle burlesque performer crowned Miss Exotic World 2018; and returning Portland-based acrobatic archer AcroBritt, who wields her bow and arrow in a uniquely well-balanced act. 3/14–4/7. Times, prices, and venues vary. moisturefestival.org

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