Food & Drink

Buy Locally Farmed Food via Online Marketplace Farmstr.com

A local entrepreneur is connecting farmers with shoppers online

By Talia Gottlieb February 28, 2014

0314farmstrseattleite

This article originally appeared in the March 2014 issue of Seattle magazine.

!–paging_filter–pRaised in Bellingham, where her family had a “hobby farm” with chickens, cows and pigs, Janelle Maiocco is no stranger to tractors and muddy barn boots. The 41-year-old mother of two has been a trained chef, food blogger and food marketer, and in September she launcheda href=”HTTP://WWW.farmstr.com” target=”_blank” Farmstr.com/a—a kind of Craigslist for locally farmed food. Two months later, Farmstr took first place at the prestigious Northwest Entrepreneur Network’s First Look Forum. The online marketplace allows small, sustainable farms (including Maiocco’s own urban farm in Wallingford) to sell organic, non-GMO foods directly to customers seeking a local source of high-quality produce, meats and dairy. Most goods are seasonal (this month, expect a variety of early spring veggies), plus a regular supply of eggs, honey, grass-fed beef, raw milk and salmon. Participating farmers deliver to a host of drop sites around the city, where they can meet buyers in person. “It’s all about the handshake, the relationship and the community building,” Maiocco says. Growers eliminate the middleman, are able to connect with people who care about the story behind their food, and ultimately become a part of the “greater solution for the food system across the country.”brbrstrongNEED TO KNOW/strongbr1/ Janelle Maiocco plans to take Farmstr nationwide, and will begin expansion to Portland in late 2014. brbr2/ According to Maiocco, farmers selling to grocery stores make an estimated 11–16 cents on the dollar, but Farmstr earns them as much as five to six times more. brbr3/ Farmstr employs five people, and works with more than 40 farmers and 300 customers—and those numbers are on the rise. brbr4/ At a recent Northwest entrepreneur competition, the company beat out several startup ideas, including bicycle helmets with integrated rearview mirrors and topical medication embedded in textiles. brbr5/ Maiocco’s advice for entrepreneurs: “Don’t look back. Succeed—or fail big.”/p

 

Follow Us

Dark Emotions, Lighthearted Interactions

Dark Emotions, Lighthearted Interactions

Whim W’Him presents two emotion-inducing premieres to close out the season

Last weekend, choreographer Olivier Wevers stood on the stage at Cornish Playhouse, asking the audience to drop their preconceived notions and open their hearts to art...

Abrupt Write Turn

Abrupt Write Turn

Zachary Kellian’s decision to pursue a new career nets him recognition

Zachary Kellian ditched a career he loved, as he puts it, “to live out a dream.”

Finding Place in Pictures

Finding Place in Pictures

Artist Sky Hopinka’s first solo museum exhibit in the northwest showcases his creative approach to language and identity

“I had cassette tapes and workbooks, but it was hard because I was living in Washington, and my tribal language has roots in Wisconsin,” Sky Hopinka says. Learning alone, he could listen to prerecorded Hocak phrases and practice writing letters and words, but an essential component was missing — another person to speak with. Photo

Feeding Ghosts to Free Them

Feeding Ghosts to Free Them

Artist Tessa Hulls creates a revealing graphic novel to help her deal with childhood trauma

Seattle artist Tessa Hulls’ new graphic novel Feeding Ghosts is a deeply stirring narrative of loss, mental illness, and intergenerational trauma. She says that she wrote it to answer this question: What broke my family? Much of the book is about repetition, and how three generations of women in Hulls’ family were emotionally crippled by