Food & Drink

Diaper Stork Brings Parents Convenient Alternatives

A Greenwood woman creates an ideal baby diaper service for harried parents

By Kate Calamusa February 10, 2015

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This article originally appeared in the March 2015 issue of Seattle magazine.

Jen Harwood describes herself as an “extreme planner,” a personality trait that parents the city over can be thankful for. While thinking about starting a family with her husband, the Greenwood resident began to weigh the differences between cloth and disposable diapers—the ecological and health benefits of cloth won out, but existing diaper services missed the mark.So she launched Diaper Stork last September, a flat-rate cloth diaper service serving Seattle and the greater Eastside. “There are such startling numbers on the amount of waste created by disposable diapers,” says the former financial consultant. “But cloth diapers can be incredibly intimidating for new parents, even those who really want to try.”

Diaper Stork aims to streamline the process with static pricing not dependent on the number of diapers used, unlike many other diaper services, as well as online ordering and a “wash my stash” option for couples who want to buy their own diaper supply, but eschew the dirty laundry.

For the standard package, at $110 a month, a generous supply of clean, 100 percent unbleached cotton-twill diapers is delivered once a week, with Diaper Stork providing a lined pail for easy disposal; once returned, the diapers are laundered in biodegradable detergent. Parents can also tack on a weekly cotton-flannel-wipe service ($20/month), as well as purchase starter sets with diaper covers and travel wet bags for changes on the go, gift certificates for other families, and even eco-friendly, chemical-free products from the company’s online shop, such as upcycled wool leggings ($29) or paraben-free products from Baby Moon.

 

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