Food & Drink

Modernist Cuisine on Display at the Pacific Science Center

By Seattle Mag October 7, 2013

1013modernist

This article originally appeared in the October 2013 issue of Seattle magazine.

A hyper-nerdy take on cooking, molecular gastronomy considers food at the chemical level—how exactly does heat make an egg physically transform? Seattle entrepreneur Nathan Myhrvold helped popularize this science with his book Modernist Cuisine (2011), which includes stunning photos of food in the moment of being cooked, taken at his Bellevue kitchen laboratory. Using unusual techniques, including sawing pots and pans in half, Myhrvold’s team shows us food as we’ve never seen it before. Now 100 of the shots are on display in large-format size, so you can get to know your food up close and personally. 10/26–2/17/2014. Times and prices vary. Pacific Science Center, 200 Second Ave. N; 206.443.2001; pacsci.org 

 

Follow Us

Dynamic And Engaging: The Call Of Calder

Dynamic And Engaging: The Call Of Calder

As a teenager, former Microsoft executive Jon Shirley fell in love with the works of Alexander Calder. He’s now sharing his passion with the public.

For me, moving around The Eagle, taking it in outside of traditional gallery walls and interacting with it, choosing how I saw the work, was a totally new way to experience art...

The Art in This Leschi Yard is Literally Immersive

The Art in This Leschi Yard is Literally Immersive

One local collector’s transformed front yard features a new swimming pool with a custom installation

When architect Ian Butcher signed on to design an outdoor space for a local philanthropist and art collector, it turned out to be a double dose of revisiting the past...

Longtime Seattle Artist Mary Ann Peters Opens Show at the Frye 

Longtime Seattle Artist Mary Ann Peters Opens Show at the Frye 

Peters’ first solo museum show is a testament to her decades-long career

After more than 30 years of active involvement in Seattle’s art scene, Mary Ann Peters finally has her first solo museum show...

The First Sculptor of Seattle

The First Sculptor of Seattle

James Wehn's work can still be seen all over the city

My first encounter with the work of James Wehn occurred in the 1980s during a family trip to the Seattle Center. At some point that day we found ourselves walking around in the nearby Belltown neighborhood when someone in the group pointed to a statue of Chief Seattle. The 400-pound bronze statue sits at Tilikum…