Food & Drink

New School Art School: Seattle Artist League Puts People First

The new Northgate school offers flexible, community-centric art classes

By Megan Toal February 21, 2018

Lendy-and-Ruthie

This article originally appeared in the February 2018 issue of Seattle magazine.

This article appears in print in the February 2018 issueClick here to subscribe.

Artist Ruthie V. and City Catering owner Lendy Hensley met as teacher and student a few years ago at an oil painting class at the Pratt Fine Arts Center and quickly formed a close friendship, bonding over a love of art and the energy of the creative community.

Inspired by their shared values, the two formed the Seattle Artist League (Northgate, 10219 Aurora Ave. N; 206.483.9749) in 2016, calling it a “people come first” art school.

How is it different than nonprofit art centers like Pratt or Gage? Its founders see art as a shared activity and put students at the center of their approach to teaching. The one-and-a-half- to four-hour courses take the pressure off of creating perfect artwork; instead, students focus on experimenting with individual styles with the support and fellowship of classmates.

Classes range from figure drawing sessions ($14 per session) to six- to eight-week courses, such as portrait painting ($310), and are offered by a staff of artists and art academics in the morning, afternoon and evening hours to accommodate busy professionals, so that anyone with an interest in art—and connecting with others with similar goals—can pursue their dream.

 

Follow Us

Clearing Up Misperceptions about Juneteenth

Clearing Up Misperceptions about Juneteenth

Delbert Richardson’s traveling museum seeks to educate, inform

Delbert Richardson wants to set the record straight...

Finding Freedom 

Finding Freedom 

Seattle author Stacey Levine’s new book, Mice 1961, follows two sisters during a single day of their fraught relationship

From the get-go, Stacey Levine’s latest novel, Mice 1961, plunges the reader into a story of motion. “I’m interested in playing with language,” says Levine, who, in addition to authoring several novels and a book of short stories, teaches English composition and creative writing at Seattle Central College. “I’m also intrigued by the drama of

Celebrating 50 Years of Seattle Pride

Celebrating 50 Years of Seattle Pride

From 200 people in 1974 to more than 300,000 today, Seattle Pride has grown into Washington’s largest parade

Seattle's LGBTQ+ history stretches back to the late 1800s when Pioneer Square, known at the time as "Fairyville," was a sanctuary for the queer community, housing thriving gay bars and social spaces...

Tacoma Art Museum Reckons With the Roots of One of its Biggest Collections 

Tacoma Art Museum Reckons With the Roots of One of its Biggest Collections 

TAM’s latest show reconsiders the meaning of Western American art

On the night of Nov. 3, 1885, a mob composed of hundreds of people marched through Tacoma, expelling members of the Chinese community from their homes, intimidating them (with weapons and threats) into leaving the city permanently, and then burning down the remaining houses — often with all of the victim’s possessions still inside.  The…