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New True Crime Podcast Investigates Grisly Pacific Northwest Cases

Two former local radio anchors team up for 'Scene of the Crime'

By Daria Kroupoderova April 6, 2020

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This article originally appeared in the April 2020 issue of Seattle magazine.

This article appears in print in the April 2020 issue. Click here to subscribe.

Veteran local reporters Carolyn Ossorio and Kim Shepard spent years scooping juicy news stories for radio, so it’s no surprise their transitions into podcasting were criminally smooth. This winter, the former anchors teamed up to launch Scene of the Crime, a new true crime podcast exploring horrific misdeeds in the Pacific Northwest.

 “I wanted to bring not just the gory details of the crime…but [to] really talk about why we like true crime,” Ossorio says. “It’s not just because we like to watch other people suffer,” she adds, noting that she finds true crime most interesting in how it depicts victims in a way she finds relatable. The first full season is now available online and through podcast apps, with 12 hair-raising episodes covering everything from the Green River Killer to the Wah Mee massacre.

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