Food & Drink

Nutcracker Peek and Other Holiday Events

Let the holiday rumpus begin

By Seattle Mag November 12, 2013

1213nutcracker

This article originally appeared in the December 2013 issue of Seattle magazine.

!–paging_filter–pSeasoned Nutcracker fans know exactly when to watch for it: at the top of the second act. That’s when an “Easter egg” of sorts appears in the background of the set illustrator Maurice Sendak designed specifically for Pacific Northwest Ballet’s production of Nutcracker. All but hidden, the sneaky little Wild Thing gets a glimpse of the action, with Sugar Plum Fairies dancing in its horned head. This year marks the 30th anniversary of PNB’s beloved production, which means whether you attend every year or haven’t yet been, it’s the perfect time to ensconce yourself in Tchaikovsky’s memorable score and watch the festivities both on stage and in the audience. a href=”http://\/\/seattlemag.com/roundup-holiday-events-and-around-seattle” target=”_blank”Go here for more festive holiday events./a Times and prices vary. 11/30–12/29. McCaw Hall, 301 Mercer St.; 206.441.2424;a href=”http://www.pnb.org” target=”_blank” pnb.org /a/p

 

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