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Seattle Painter has a Love for Miniature Art

Local artist's paintings are miniature and masterful

By Haley Durslag March 14, 2016

A painting of a white rabbit in a chair.

This article originally appeared in the April 2016 issue of Seattle magazine.

Rebecca Luncan’s animal portraits are remarkable for their comprehensive realism, but even more so for their size—some as small as 3 inches.

The Seattle painter says her fascination with the miniscule was stirred by a miniature portrayal of Henry VIII she spotted when visiting Buckingham Palace. “You must get so close that the experience is yours alone,” says Luncan. “For that moment, what you’re seeing is an intimate secret between you and the painting.” In April, Luncan wraps up a yearlong “monthly miniatures” painting project of her bunny muses, Charlemagne and Eleanor, who like to sit on her feet as she paints.

Luncan’s next monthly miniature series will draw from the “fond memories of the animals kept by her father during her childhood”—but she’ll also accept commissions for paintings of your family pets (3 by 3 inches, from $250). Keep track of her animal installments and find more details about commissioning a portrait of Fido or Fluffy at rebeccaluncan.com

 

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