Food & Drink

Seattle’s Thunderpussy Heats Up Capitol Hill’s Annual Block Party

High-octane band knows how to rock like a girl

By Jim Demetre July 5, 2016

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This article originally appeared in the July 2016 issue of Seattle magazine.

Among the many acts at this year’s Capitol Hill Block Party (CHBP) is the neighborhood’s very own Thunderpussy, the scorching hot, high-octane female rock band, which performs at Neumos on July 24. Band members Molly Sides, Whitney Petty, Leah Julius and Lena Simon take on all the masculine tropes of hard rock, recharging them with their own raw feminine sexual energy.

Every July since 1997, at the peak of Seattle’s summer, CHBP has transformed the Pike/Pine corridor into a land of guitars, beer gardens and Marshall stacks. From its modest beginnings with one small stage, CHBP has expanded into a three-day music and arts festival, celebrating the city’s iconic neighborhood and its vibrant music scene.

Incorporating some of the city’s most important clubs and music venues, the party now inhabits six city blocks and showcases more than 100 local and national artists.

 

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