Food & Drink

Spy Exhibit at Pacific Science Center Puts Gadgets on Display

A new exhibit showcases the history of spy gadgetry

By Seattle Mag March 3, 2014

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This article originally appeared in the March 2014 issue of Seattle magazine.

!–paging_filter–pShoes with recording devices built into the heels, coins embedded with deadly needles, pens that shoot tear gas, umbrellas that fire poison pellets—ah, for the olden days of spying, before the NSA began monitoring our phone conversations, Google started tracking Internet searches and drones filled the skies. View history through James Bond goggles at the new Pacific Science Center exhibit Spy: The Secret World of Espionage, featuring nearly 300 gadgets, declassified CIA artifacts, and documents from the FBI and NRO (National Reconnaissance Office). While the objects have a quaint sort of Get Smart appeal, many were crucial to history-altering missions. And lest you get too smug about old-school spy tech, try making your way through the interactive laser field without tripping a single circuit. 3/29–9/1. Pacific Science Center, 200 Second Ave. N; 206.443.2001; a href=”http://www.pacificsciencecenter.org” target=”_blank”pacificsciencecenter.org /a/p

 

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