Food & Drink

Two Beloved Seattle Movie Theaters Have Closed

The future of the buildings is unclear.

By Callie Little June 6, 2017

45th-guild-780-x-486

Two of Seattle’s classic movie theaters have shuttered, at least temporarily.

“The Seven Gables and Guild 45th have closed. Please stay tuned for future details on our renovation plans for each location,” states Landmark Theatres’ website regarding their two Seattle locations: Wallingford’s Guild 45th and the University District’s Seven Gables. The news comes just over a year after the Guild 45th was nominated for landmark status. As of this writing, no further announcements regarding the future of the two properties have been made.

Built in 1919, the Guild 45th is as dear to Seattle as its sister theater, the Seven Gables. The latter was originally built as a dance hall in 1925 and converted to a theater in 1976. To see the two simultaneously close so abruptly is bitterly reminiscent of the Harvard Exit’s own inglorious closure in 2015.

While the Guild 45th and Seven Gables had certainly seen better days, we can’t help but wonder: What beloved theater will be next? In the final days of the 2017 Seattle International Film Festival, support your favorite local screen; you never know when the curtain may fall.

 

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