Food & Drink

A Very Literary Ferry Ride

Shiro Kashiba discusses his memoir on September 28 on the Bainbridge Island Ferry

By Seattle Mag September 23, 2013

ferry

This article originally appeared in the September 2013 issue of Seattle magazine.

Northwest sushi pioneer Shiro Kashiba livens up the ferry ride to Bainbridge Island by talking about his memoir, Shiro, as part of Kitsap Regional Library’s new on-board Ferry Tales program. Upon landing, take the 10-minute walk to Intentional Table in Winslow for a sushi tasting directed by Shiro himself. Ferry departs Seattle at 3 p.m. on September 28. Sushi tasting at 4 p.m. krlferrytales.wordpress.com.

 

Follow Us

Dark Emotions, Lighthearted Interactions

Dark Emotions, Lighthearted Interactions

Whim W’Him presents two emotion-inducing premieres to close out the season

Last weekend, choreographer Olivier Wevers stood on the stage at Cornish Playhouse, asking the audience to drop their preconceived notions and open their hearts to art...

Abrupt Write Turn

Abrupt Write Turn

Zachary Kellian’s decision to pursue a new career nets him recognition

Zachary Kellian ditched a career he loved, as he puts it, “to live out a dream.”

Finding Place in Pictures

Finding Place in Pictures

Artist Sky Hopinka’s first solo museum exhibit in the northwest showcases his creative approach to language and identity

“I had cassette tapes and workbooks, but it was hard because I was living in Washington, and my tribal language has roots in Wisconsin,” Sky Hopinka says. Learning alone, he could listen to prerecorded Hocak phrases and practice writing letters and words, but an essential component was missing — another person to speak with. Photo

Feeding Ghosts to Free Them

Feeding Ghosts to Free Them

Artist Tessa Hulls creates a revealing graphic novel to help her deal with childhood trauma

Seattle artist Tessa Hulls’ new graphic novel Feeding Ghosts is a deeply stirring narrative of loss, mental illness, and intergenerational trauma. She says that she wrote it to answer this question: What broke my family? Much of the book is about repetition, and how three generations of women in Hulls’ family were emotionally crippled by