Food & Drink

Where to Celebrate the Chinese New Year

Channel your inner Fire Monkey at the sixth annual Lunar New Year Celebration

By Jennifer Meyers January 25, 2016

Chinese lion dancers on a street.

This article originally appeared in the February 2016 issue of Seattle magazine.

It’s time to celebrate another new year, in lunar style. The Chinese New Year begins in February, and it is the Year of the Fire Monkey—a zodiac sign that only occurs once every 60 years.

The character is usually regarded as clever, witty sociable and surrounded by lots of friends. Channel your inner Fire Monkey at the sixth annual Lunar New Year Celebration (cidbia.org) to celebrate the Chinese New Year. The free event takes place from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on February 13 at Hing Hay Park in Seattle’s Chinatown/International District, where you can indulge in the $3 Food Walk, sampling Chinese, Vietnamese, Japanese and Korean food, and enjoy cultural performances, beginning with the traditional lion and dragon dances, which will parade through the neighborhood to bless local businesses for the coming year.

 

Follow Us

Dark Emotions, Lighthearted Interactions

Dark Emotions, Lighthearted Interactions

Whim W’Him presents two emotion-inducing premieres to close out the season

Last weekend, choreographer Olivier Wevers stood on the stage at Cornish Playhouse, asking the audience to drop their preconceived notions and open their hearts to art...

Abrupt Write Turn

Abrupt Write Turn

Zachary Kellian’s decision to pursue a new career nets him recognition

Zachary Kellian ditched a career he loved, as he puts it, “to live out a dream.”

Finding Place in Pictures

Finding Place in Pictures

Artist Sky Hopinka’s first solo museum exhibit in the northwest showcases his creative approach to language and identity

“I had cassette tapes and workbooks, but it was hard because I was living in Washington, and my tribal language has roots in Wisconsin,” Sky Hopinka says. Learning alone, he could listen to prerecorded Hocak phrases and practice writing letters and words, but an essential component was missing — another person to speak with. Photo

Feeding Ghosts to Free Them

Feeding Ghosts to Free Them

Artist Tessa Hulls creates a revealing graphic novel to help her deal with childhood trauma

Seattle artist Tessa Hulls’ new graphic novel Feeding Ghosts is a deeply stirring narrative of loss, mental illness, and intergenerational trauma. She says that she wrote it to answer this question: What broke my family? Much of the book is about repetition, and how three generations of women in Hulls’ family were emotionally crippled by