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This Week Then: Looking Back on President Warren Harding’s Last Speech

Plus: Three anniversaries atop and above Mount Rainier

President Warren G. Harding in motorcade on First Avenue, Seattle in 1923

Alan Stein

This Week Then: Looking Back on the Moon Landing

Plus: Washington's first automobile

This story was originally published at HistoryLink.org. Subscribe to their weekly newsletter. Walking on the Moon Fifty years ago this week, on July 20, 1969, the world looked on in amazement as Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first humans to walk on the moon. In Washington, Boeing workers took pride in helping the astronauts achieve…

Alan Stein

This Week Then: Six Seattle Area Bridges Celebrate Birthdays

Plus: All aboard the Suffrage Special

University Bridge, 1927

Alan Stein

This Week Then: Celebrating Seattle’s Pride

Plus: Looking back on UFO sightings near Mt. Rainier

This story was originally published at HistoryLink.org. Subscribe to their weekly newsletter. Seattle Pride During the last week of June 1974, local lesbians and gays celebrated Seattle’s first Gay Pride Week, which included the opening of the Gay Community Center, a picnic in Occidental Park, and a “Gay-In” at Seattle Center. The celebration has grown over the…

Alan Stein

This Week Then: Five Washington Towns Celebrate Birthdays

Plus: Significant fires in Washington history

Snoqualmie, home of “Twin Peaks,” turns 116 this week

Alan Stein

This Week Then: Looking Back on the Seattle SuperSonics

Plus: This week's nautical anniversaries

This story was originally published at HistoryLink.org. Subscribe to their weekly newsletter. Champion Team Forty years ago this week, on June 1, 1979, the Seattle SuperSonics beat the Washington Bullets 97-93 in Washington, D.C., and brought home the team’s first (and only) NBA championship. It was the city’s first major professional-sports trophy since the Seattle Metropolitans hockey…

Alan Stein

This Week Then: Giving a Hoot About Northern Spotted Owls

Plus: Honoring Washington state residents who lost their lives in combat

This story was originally published at HistoryLink.org. Subscribe to their weekly newsletter. Giving a Hoot On May 23, 1991, U.S. District Court Judge William Dwyer blocked timber sales in national forests to protect the northern spotted owl, after the National Audubon Society and the Sierra Club Legal Defense Fund challenged the U.S. Forest Service’s 1986 Forest Management…

Alan Stein

This Week Then: How Seattle’s UW Campus Took Shape

Plus: Shelton, Blaine and Hoquiam turn 129

This story was originally published at HistoryLink.org. Subscribe to their weekly newsletter. Campus Sights In 1895 the University of Washington moved from downtown Seattle to its present location, which at the time was heavily forested and undeveloped. The campus took root on the northern portion of the property, but as the university grew its regents sought ways…

Alan Stein

This Week Then: I-5 Turns 50

The new freeway helped boost the development of Washington cities along its route

This story was originally published at HistoryLink.org. Subscribe to their weekly newsletter. Interstate 5 Fifty years ago this week, on May 14, 1969, the final segment of Interstate 5 in Washington opened for traffic between Marysville and Everett, allowing motorists to travel without interruption from the Canadian border to the California state line. The new freeway also…

Alan Stein