‘Designed to be Home’ Celebrates Northwest Interiors

A Kirkland designer’s new coffee table book celebrates the Northwest home

By Sarah Murphy

0317_shelterharmony

March 10, 2017

This article originally appeared in the March 2017 issue of Seattle Magazine.

When is a dining room not a dining room? In the case of “Instrumental Elements,” one of 12 Northwest home projects highlighted in Kirkland designer Harmony Weihs’ new coffee table book, Designed to Be Home, it’s when the space is reimagined as a music library. For these particular Redmond clients, Weihs turned the dining corner of a great room into an intimate library space—complete with a dramatically hung bass on one wall. 

 

Weihs, who previously designed apparel for several Seattle-based corporations before launching her own apparel and interior design business in 2006, has filled the book ($69; designharmonyinfo.com) with personal anecdotes from each project, accompanied by photos. Black-and-white photos show her clients living in their new space; color photos highlight details of the rooms. Weihs, who often uses reclaimed and refurbished materials in her projects, says her goal is to create rooms that are approachable, relaxing and functional for the occupants; you could say, rooms that are in harmony.

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