February 2012

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A Fair to Remember

Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Seattle's 1962 World's Fair.

Fifty years ago, Seattle threw a party for the world. The World’s Fair—called The Century 21 Exposition—was a celebration of Space Age innovation at a time of hope and futuristic yearnings. Our city, once regarded by many as a muddy Wild West outpost, was thrust into the world’s spotlight, suddenly becoming sophisticated and cutting edge….

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Seattle Remembers the Japanese Internment

Seventy years ago this month, hundreds of Bainbridge Island residents were given 6 days to leave the

A wrenching chapter in our region’s history was written 70 years ago this month: the internment of thousands of Japanese Americans. In 1942, in the wake of the Pearl Harbor attack, amidst war hysteria, racism and fears of sabotage, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, forcing the evacuation of 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry (two-thirds…

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A World of Difference

Our fearless editorial director reflects on the 1962 World's Fair and the lasting optimism it brough

In 2006, when we produced an anniversary issue celebrating this magazine’s 40-year evolution from Pacific Search, to Pacific Northwest, to Seattle Home and Garden to the Seattle mag you’re reading today, we invited local notables to write about the key events and people responsible for shaping our city over the last 40 years. A common…

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Boat Street Cafe’s Pork Chop

The double-cut Carlton Farms pork chop is outstanding.

In a town that’s plenty pork happy already (try to remember the last time you didn’t see pork belly on a menu), Boat Street Café’s double-cut Carlton Farms pork chop is outstanding. Roasted to a deep bronze, the thick chop is nestled atop a savory tangle of kale and Beecher’s cheddar cheese, and then brightened…

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The Coterie Room’s Haute Comfort Food

In recent years, the simple comfort foods that star in our sepia-toned childhood memories have had an even greater pull on us. Ice cream shops, burger joints and doughnut dynasties have multiplied, doling out creamy, salty, sweet and (this is key!) affordable indulgences. But this isn’t anything new: Pros and home cooks alike have dressed…

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LloydMartin Allures with Small Plates

A stylish new eatery opens on Queen Anne Avenue, serving food you won't want to share.

Sometimes a restaurant feels just right in its space. LloydMartin, chef Sam Crannell’s masculine den on Queen Anne Avenue (the former location of Bricco wine bar) is such a place. With room for a dozen at the bar, with polished walnut and reclaimed-wood banquettes, it’s an ideal place to duck into for a glass of…

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Bako Disappoints

Capitol Hill had high hopes for this new Cantonese eatery. Does it deliver?

Depending on whom you ask, finding great Chinese food in Seattle is either tricky or downright impossible, because it doesn’t exist. Local Chinese-food aficionados have been known to respond to the question “Where should I go to dim sum?” with a sassy “Vancouver, B.C.” So one could argue that Bako, with its promising modern take…

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West Seattle Fish House

A great spot if you're craving affordable seafood for lunch.

On a somewhat sparse stretch of 35th Avenue in West Seattle, sisters Senait Beyene and Muzit Evans have opened a casual fried-fish eatery that the neighborhood is warmly embracing. And it ought to: The panko in the cod’s coating fries up to an audible crunch ($8.99/three pieces, with fries) and makes for a mighty satisfying…

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The Barrel-aged Cocktails Trend

Local expert A.J. Rathbun finds the best barrel-aged cocktails at local bars.

When writing about aged cocktails, I feel I should start with, “It all starts a long time ago, in a faraway place,” as if my grandfather were telling me a story. In the case of the aged cocktail trend, that long time ago was the fall of 2009 (which is about a hundred years ago…

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Seattle’s Sustainable-Seating Renaissance

Pull up a chair and invest in a functional work of art made in Seattle.

What’s the purpose of the split down the middle of Henrybuilt’s Wood Bench 3? “It helps the seat to hug your bottom,” says Lisa Day, Seattle-based Henrybuilt’s director of marketing. The split divides the bench into two long slabs of wood, which angle down slightly toward the center, making it more comfortable than a standard…

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15 Ways to Stay Fit (While Staying Inside)

A stir-crazy urban athlete’s guide to indoor sports in Seattle.

If the cold, wet weather and shorter days are putting a damper on your outdoor workout, head inside and try something new. Here are a few cool ways to feel the burn—without catching a chill. Climb the walls Perhaps it’s no surprise that the world’s first indoor climbing gym opened its doors in rainy Seattle…

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Quinton Morris Takes on Carnegie Hall

A local concert violinist is making beautiful music, pioneering a new music education program—and ga

Just as this issue hits the stands, a young concert violinist who went to high school in Renton and now lives in Seattle’s International District is making his solo debut at Carnegie Hall. On January 21, Dr. Quinton Morris—director of chamber and instrumental music and assistant professor of music at Seattle University (SU)—plays a program…

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Stevie Chao

Arts: Stevie Shao

The Seattle muralist and illustrator understands the power of public art

Stevie Shao is one of Seattle’s 25 most influential people reshaping our region. #mostinfluential   When the Covid-19 pandemic started, Stevie Shao had never painted a mural. By the time Washington state lifted its lockdown order 15 months later, Shao had become one of the most in-demand public artists and illustrators in Seattle.  What started as…

Angela Garbes by Elizabeth Rudge-cropped

The Art of Weathering Winter: What “Self-Care” Really Is (and Isn’t)

How to cultivate more community, according to author Angela Garbes & State Representative Darya Farivar

The term “self-care” has become so overused that its meaning can be bent to almost any purpose. Is it indulging in a cocktail or abstaining from booze? Is it splurging on a skincare product or making peace with fine lines? Some have begun to use the term “community care” to refer to a commitment toward…