March/April 2022

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Seattle’s Inclusionary Future

What if everyone is important?

Editor’s note: Brenda Cooper is a Kirkland-based short-story writer, poet and futurist who has written 10 novels. Her most recent books are “Edge of Dark” and its sequel, “Spear of Light.” The former won the 2016 Endeavor Award for science fiction or fantasy by a Northwest author. In this column, Cooper discusses the importance of…

Seattle Magazine executive editor, Rob Smith

Editor’s Note: A Reinvention

A new city, a new magazine

As celebrated author Ray Bradbury once said, the future is simply more of the same if all you ever do is look around. “To hell with more,” Bradbury said. “I want better.” Don’t we all, in Seattle and, well, everywhere. As the pandemic seemingly eases and mask requirements fade, it’s time for bold risks and…

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Seattle Artifacts: Crime, Politics and Pinball

Competing factions resorted to bombs during Seattle’s pinball war

Back in the 1950s, Seattle was rocked by a series of late-night bombings that were connected to regional crime syndicates battling for control over the city’s lucrative pinball market. In this article — my first for “Seattle” magazine — I take a look at how a small trove of brass amusement licenses discovered during a…

Seattle Magazine owner and publisher, Jonathan Sposato

Publisher’s Note: A Different Seattle Nice

Launching a new era of kindness and respect

Hey! Who Killed Nice? And for that matter, has anyone seen Civility, Kindness and Manners? I jest, of course, but I think you get my point. Giving in to our unending impulse to be right, or righteous, our society is in a constant quest to correct, criticize, reprimand and yes, cancel those who don’t agree with…

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Letter to Seattle: A Lasting Influence

‘I would like to pay homage to you all who have set such an extraordinary example’

Letter to Seattle is a new feature highlighting the good deeds and positive experiences in our region. This is a letter from a client at Pioneer Human Services, a Seattle nonprofit that provides treatment, housing, job skills training and employment to those recently incarcerated. Submissions welcomed at [email protected] Dear Pioneer Human Services, I want to…

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Mayor Bruce Harrell: Can He Save Our City?

New Mayor Bruce Harrell has an almost singular focus on uniting deep divisions within Seattle

“If there’s one thing I believe in, it is that there’s ‘one’ Seattle. in ‘one’ Seattle, we put in the work and we lead with humility, urgency and compassion.” New Seattle Mayor Bruce Harrell wasted little time in tackling one of the city’s thorniest issues. Just 40 days after his swearing-in, Harrell signed an executive…

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Seattle’s Mushroom Queen

First, it was a cupcake empire and cannabis edibles.
Now, Jody Hall is focused on liquid mushrooms.

If there’s a trendy new culinary craze in Seattle, chances are Jody Hall is behind it. Hall, of course, founded Seattle’s iconic Cupcake Royale back in 2003. At the time, it was one of the first cupcake cafés west of New York City. She then became what “Money” magazine called “The Weed Queen of Washington”…

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Books: ‘Seattle’s Streetcar Era’

Riding a streetcar in the 1930s was nothing like today

Seattle has a mixed history with transportation solutions. A new book, “Seattle’s Streetcar Era, An Illustrated History, 1884-1941,” details almost six decades of Seattle’s streetcars, from the 13 private companies that once ran streetcar lines to one of the nation’s first publicly-owned transportation systems. The author, Mike Bergman, is well-versed in both transportation and history….

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Fashion: Quiet the Wild

Layer up and enjoy the beauty of Seattle outdoors

Created by Andrew Burkhardt | Styled by Michele Andrews

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One Couple’s Kitchen Quest

Living in the backyard. Climbing through windows. Here’s how one family made it work.

The idea to remodel their 1929 kitchen floated on the fringes of the imaginations of Nick O’Connell and Lisa Sowder for years, thoughts that bobbed to the surface only to be tossed aside by the sheer impracticality of it all. How could they, two busy professionals with three children and a dog, undertake a full-scale…

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AIA Home of Distinction: Harmony with History

A creative remodel of an historic capitol hill condo results in a peaceful and intimate setting where old-world luxury meets a book lover’s retreat

Imagine owning enough books to fill Portland’s famous Powell’s Books and having to boil down your collection to a single 12-foot shelf. That was just one of many personal and technical challenges facing Carol Grossmeyer in her long quest to find a forever home. Grossmeyer and her husband grew Milwaukee-based Harry W. Schwartz Bookshops, founded…

Julie Stein

Julie Stein and the Burke Museum. A Natural History Evolution.

Julie Stein calls it a career after launching the new Burke

In a distinguished career as a professor of geoarchaeology at the University of Washington and a three-decade stint at Seattle’s nationally renowned Burke Museum, Julie Stein is quick to identify one standout moment. “It has to be cutting the ribbon for the new Burke,” says Stein, who retired in March after 16 years as executive…

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The Art of Weathering Winter: What “Self-Care” Really Is (and Isn’t)

How to cultivate more community, according to author Angela Garbes & State Representative Darya Farivar

The term “self-care” has become so overused that its meaning can be bent to almost any purpose. Is it indulging in a cocktail or abstaining from booze? Is it splurging on a skincare product or making peace with fine lines? Some have begun to use the term “community care” to refer to a commitment toward…

Photography by Alex Cayley.

Deep Focus

Tom Skerritt remains more committed than ever to the creative economy in the Northwest

Tom Skerritt is one of Seattle’s 25 most influential people reshaping our region. #mostinfluential   Fans were understandably disappointed to learn that Tom Skerritt wasn’t asked to reprise his role as Commander Mike “Viper” Metcalf in “Top Gun 2.” “You can’t beat Tom Skerritt with a gun,” wrote one fan on Twitter. Skerritt has said that…