Seattle Culture

Electric Facial Treatments Are Being Called the New ‘Scalpel-Less Face Lift’

The new treatments aim to soften your skin with low-voltage electric currents.

By Nia Martin December 8, 2017

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Your routine facial just got a kick: electricity. But don’t be shocked: these noninvasive, low-current treatments (generally from less than 1 to 10 milliamps) encourage cell growth and can offer other benefits, from clearing acne to softening wrinkles. The new sensation may take some getting used to—some users report a metallic taste—but the “scalpel-less face lift” has us intrigued. Check out the buzz for yourself. (If you have a health condition, check with your doctor first.)

The Perfector Treatment and Remodeling Machine Facial, Jill Bucy SkinCare

“Electric current technology can offer benefits for every age and skin condition,” says Jill Bucy aesthetician Brynn Strader, who works with owner Svetlana Ponomareva. The two treatment options follow the swank spa’s Classic French Facial (think extractions and lymphatic massage), totaling 90 minutes. With the Perfector Treatment, skin is held in different positions with metallic-threaded electrode gloves that help tighten facial muscles ($210–$270). The device used for the Remodeling Machine Facial, with the application of superluxe Biologique Recherche serums, delivers three types of current through two sponge-covered electrodes that target different skin needs ($190–$250). Queen Anne, 600 Queen Anne Ave. N; 206.283.9295.

Foundational Facial Treatment, Dermaspace

“It’s like washing the skin from the inside out,” says Dermaspace owner Jody Leon. The 60- to 90-minute facial treatment includes a yucca root solution, extractions, infrared heat and a wrap in a special cloth with an electrode mask, which is fitted over the face and emits a galvanic current. Starts at $130. Downtown, 509 Olive Way, No. 1501; 206.849.6620.

Beyond Beauty Treatment, Liberté Beauty

“We document the face every time the client comes in,” says spa owner Liberté, so that the client can see their skin’s progress over time. This 60-minute treatment utilizes meditation, oil blends and a galvanic current through conductive silver and copper fabric that covers skin from the hairline to the décolletage. $299 for first two-hour appointment with consultation; packages available. Ballard, 1737 NW 56th St.; 206.335.4453.

 

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