Architecture

Is Seattle ready for high-rises built of wood after 80 years of concrete-and-steel buildings?

Make sure their visit goes smoothly by following these simple steps

New amenities, plantings and paving elevate these outdoor living spaces

When the doors open wide at this waterfront residence on one of the San Juan Islands, it’s hard to tell where the indoors ends and the outdoors begins.

The ’40s bungalow just “felt right” as soon as Shannon and Pablo Supkay walked through the front door of the 2,000-square-foot house 10 years ago in Seattle’s Lakewood neighborhood.The two-bedroom house had a cozy atmosphere, the neighborhood was

“We wanted to buy the worst possible property,” says Jody Estes, reminiscing about the house hunt she and her husband began in July 2007.

This article originally appeared on Houzz.com.

Nestled among the firs and cedars on the Whatcom County peninsula of Point Roberts sits a modest, 1,600-square-foot structure made bold with a simple, rustic design that frames the forest and gracefully captures the light of the passing day.