Rachel Gallaher

Finding Freedom 

Finding Freedom 

Seattle author Stacey Levine’s new book, Mice 1961, follows two sisters during a single day of their fraught relationship

From the get-go, Stacey Levine’s latest novel, Mice 1961, plunges the reader into a story of motion. “I’m interested in playing with language,” says Levine, who, in addition to authoring several novels and a book of short stories, teaches English composition and creative writing at Seattle Central College. “I’m also intrigued by the drama of small, unnoticed, everyday life things.”

Tacoma Art Museum Reckons With the Roots of One of its Biggest Collections 

Tacoma Art Museum Reckons With the Roots of One of its Biggest Collections 

TAM’s latest show reconsiders the meaning of Western American art

On the night of Nov. 3, 1885, a mob composed of hundreds of people marched through Tacoma, expelling members of the Chinese community from their homes, intimidating them (with weapons and threats) into leaving the city permanently, and then burning down the remaining houses — often with all of the victim’s possessions still inside.  The…

Dark Emotions, Lighthearted Interactions

Dark Emotions, Lighthearted Interactions

Whim W’Him presents two emotion-inducing premieres to close out the season

Last weekend, choreographer Olivier Wevers stood on the stage at Cornish Playhouse, asking the audience to drop their preconceived notions and open their hearts to art…

Authentic, Inclusive, Functional

Authentic, Inclusive, Functional

These three Seattle brands are forging unique paths in fashion

Despite the ubiquitous “casual and comfortable” look, Northwest dressing is starting to take a more thoughtful turn — it just requires a discerning eye to spot the elusive trendsetters. When talking street style, Seattle might fall flat when put up against New York, Paris, or Los Angeles, but many of its designers are leaning into the pioneering spirit of the Pacific Northwest to produce an interesting sartorial output, much of it grounded in social good.

Finding Place in Pictures

Finding Place in Pictures

Artist Sky Hopinka’s first solo museum exhibit in the northwest showcases his creative approach to language and identity

“I had cassette tapes and workbooks, but it was hard because I was living in Washington, and my tribal language has roots in Wisconsin,” Sky Hopinka says. Learning alone, he could listen to prerecorded Hocak phrases and practice writing letters and words, but an essential component was missing — another person to speak with.

Photo by Sky Hopinka, Mnemonics of Shape and Reason (Still), 2021. Digital Video (Color, Sound); 4:12 Min.

Back to the Future

Back to the Future

Seattle's Central District is reclaiming its rich history

One of the Central District’s original settlers was Black pioneer and businessman William Grose — the owner of the Our House hotel and restaurant on Yesler Way and the first Black person to buy property in what was known as East Madison in 1882.

Illustration by Martin Haake

The Indie Darling

The Indie Darling

Known for its gritty, industrial past, Georgetown now boasts an eclectic mix of locally-owned cafés, restaurants, and shops

“When I first arrived in Seattle, I was working in a welding shop in Georgetown, and I also lived on Airport Way,” says Tim Ptak, who opened the popular diner Smarty Pants in 2003. “There was nowhere to eat except for grabbing fried chicken at the Shell gas station, and I wanted to open a place where people could get a good lunch and grab something to drink after work.”

Illustration by Martin Haake

Most Influential, Education: Quinton Morris

Most Influential, Education: Quinton Morris

Artist, educator

I’m committed to educating and helping students transform their lives through Key to Change. My goal is to expand the program to reach more students…

Photo by Sung Park

A Slice Above the Rest

A Slice Above the Rest

With grace and grit, Niles Peacock has worked his way to the top of the pizza world

“This has to be a joke.” That’s the first thing that passed through Niles Peacock’s head as he stood reading the results of the 2022 International Pizza Challenge in Las Vegas…

Photo by Steve Parent Photography

Most Influential, Arts: Anthony White

Most Influential, Arts: Anthony White

Artist, curator

White helped in the development and creation of the Lillian Miller Foundation Fellowship for Trans* and Indigiqueer Artists — a $10,000 unrestricted cash award offered for Washington state artists of all disciplines who self-identify as trans. “There was a lack of grants focused on trans and Indigiqueer artists,” White notes. “Offering this grant welcomes in more people.”

Photo by James Harnois

Turn up the Music

Turn up the Music

Totem Star's new home expands its footprint by tenfold

“The studio was usually full,” says Totem cofounder, star singer, songwriter, and producer Daniel Pak. “And then we’d have a duo playing guitar out on the stairs, folks rapping in the hallway or practicing in the dance studios. It was a beautiful thing, but we needed more room.”

Most Influential, Fashion: Dan McLean

Most Influential, Fashion: Dan McLean

Fashion designer

“I have such a connection to this city,” McLean says. “There’s so much happening and so many people doing cool things. I feel like once people get famous here, they move away to New York or LA, and they say, ‘Oh, there’s not enough here.’ I disagree. I don’t need to take my shows to New York. I want Seattle to be a stop during Fashion Week.”

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